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A diagnosis of
feline diabetes
can be
overwhelming.

It often means
daily injections
for life.

But our researchers
are testing an
investigational
once-daily
oral medication.

So diabetic cats
of tomorrow
may have a
brighter future with more treatment options.

Help us investigate
a brighter future
with more treatment alternatives
for cats with diabetes.

When the cat you love is diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, it can feel like a dark day. Managing feline diabetes can mean a lifetime of twice-daily insulin injections, constant worry about your cat’s health, and stress about your ability to cope with care. And if diabetes is left uncontrolled, diabetic ketoacidosis and other serious complications can develop and lead to death.

It’s a heavy burden for pet owners. But our goal is to brighten this scenario by evaluating a new liquid oral investigational medication that is administered just once a day. Our hope is that this study will result in a new FDA-approved treatment.

If your cat has been diagnosed with diabetes and meets certain study criteria, your participation could help ensure a brighter future for cats with diabetes and their caregivers by providing another treatment option.

Participation is free, and your cat will receive investigational study medication and required medical care during the study without charge.

The study will also help enrich veterinary knowledge and may result in an alternative to daily insulin injections for cats in the future.

Learn more about this important study and find out if there’s an investigator near you. Together, we can help cats with diabetes.


The medication given to cats in the study may or may not help with their condition. As with all medications, there are risks and benefits – all of which will be discussed with you prior to enrolling your cat.

We are recruiting
cats with diabetes
to evaluate a new
test medication.

Approximately 20 veterinarians are participating in this study at practices across the U.S. Clinical studies are vital to determining if a new treatment is safe and effective. This study will evaluate a new investigative oral medication for the management of diabetes in cats.

The study will involve two phases. Phase I will last 30 days, and Phase II will last for 150 days.

The study is free and includes all veterinary visits (physical exams, bloodwork, urinalysis, etc.), materials and medication related to and/or required for the study.

Why participate?

Participating cats receive study care at no cost

Participation in a clinical trial can offer your pet important diagnostic and disease-management care, and study-related procedures are free.

You may help the next generation of cats with diabetes

Our investigators hope this study will lead to approval of a new oral liquid medication that is administered once a day, giving diabetic cats and owners of tomorrow an alternative to insulin injections.

You may help advance veterinary science

Clinical trials/studies (for both animals and people) are a vital way the medical community learns more about diseases and medical conditions. This study may also give veterinarians a more complete understanding of feline diabetes and how to develop the best treatments in the future.

About the test medication

The study is evaluating a liquid medication that is either placed directly in your cat’s mouth using a supplied oral syringe, or mixed with a small amount of wet cat food, once a day.

The medication given to cats in the study may or may not help with their condition. As with all medications, there are risks and benefits – all of which will be discussed with you prior to enrolling your cat.

All feline patients in the study
will receive the test medication.
(No cats receive a placebo.)

Eligibility requirements

Phase I

A screening visit will determine if your cat is eligible. To be eligible for screening, cats must:

  • Be diagnosed with diabetes mellitus
  • Be two years of age or older
  • Be otherwise healthy, with no concurrent illness
  • Have no history of decreased appetite, vomiting, or diarrhea within 14 days prior to screening
  • Not be pregnant, lactating, or intended for breeding

(Other criteria will be reviewed with you prior to enrolling your cat.)

Phase I lasts 30 days and requires approximately four visits to the investigator site.

Phase II

Cats that complete Phase I, show improvement, and meet certain other parameters may continue into Phase II at the discretion of the investigator.

Phase II lasts 150 days and requires approximately five visits to the investigator site.

If your cat is enrolled in the study, you will be asked to:

  • Give your cat medication daily as indicated and keep a dosing record
  • Bring your cat and all materials (medication and paperwork) to the investigator’s clinic for scheduled check-ups (approximately four in Phase I and five in Phase II)
  • Provide assessment on how your cat is doing
  • Not board your cat (if at all possible) during the study
  • Make no changes to your cat’s diet during Phase I

About diabetes
mellitus

Visible signs of feline diabetes may include:

  • Polydipsia (drinking excessively)
  • Polyuria (urinating excessively)
  • Polyphagia (excessive appetite)
  • Unintended weight loss despite healthy appetite
  • Muscle loss and weakness,
    sometimes evidenced by reluctance or inability to jump
  • Lethargy or depression
  • Dull, scruffy coat

Feline diabetes is a condition that prevents a cat from producing enough insulin to balance blood sugar levels. Left untreated, it can lead to serious complications, including diabetic ketoacidosis, coma, and even death.

Managing diabetes can be difficult for pet owners, in part because it typically requires twice-daily injections of insulin.

While insulin injections are generally not painful to cats, they can be distressing to owners, and managing care of a diabetic cat presents many challenges. For example, travel and everyday scheduling can become difficult if you don’t have someone who can give your cat injections. For owners unable to provide a strict care regimen, it can mean giving up a beloved pet.

The good news is that when feline diabetes is well managed, cats will become more energetic, look better, feel better, and can live long, healthy lives.


The medication given to cats in the study may or may not help with their condition. As with all medications, there are risks and benefits – all of which will be discussed with you prior to enrolling your cat.

Frequently
asked
questions

Q1. What is a clinical trial/study?

As with new medications for people, new drugs for animals must be tested for safety and effectiveness. This specific clinical trial is regulated by the FDA (Food and Drug Administration) in order to evaluate a potential new medication for cats with diabetes mellitus.

Q2. What cats are eligible to participate in this study?

A screening visit will determine if your cat is eligible. To be eligible for screening, cats must:

  • Be diagnosed with diabetes mellitus
  • Be 2 years of age or older
  • Be otherwise healthy, with no coexisting illness
  • Have no history of decreased appetite, vomiting, or diarrhea within 14 days prior to screening
  • Not be pregnant, lactating, or intended for breeding
Q3. What are the benefits of participating?
  • Participating cats receive study-related care at no cost

    Participation in a clinical trial can offer your pet care related to the diagnosis and management of diabetes, and this study is free.

  • Your cat may help other cats in the future

    Our researchers hope this study will lead to approval of a new oral liquid medication that is administered once a day, giving diabetic cats and owners of tomorrow an alternative to insulin injections.

  • You will help advance veterinary science

    Clinical trials/studies (for both animals and people) are a vital way the medical community learns more about diseases and medical conditions – and your participation could help the next generation of cats with diabetes.

Q4. How do I get started?

To get started, review the eligibility requirements (see Q2 above), and if you believe your cat qualifies, find out if there is study site near you. The site investigator will guide you from there.

Q5. If I enroll my cat, what is required of me?
  • Give your cat medication daily as indicated, and keep a dosing record
  • Bring your cat and all materials (medication and paperwork) to the investigator’s clinic for scheduled check-ups (approximately four in Phase I and five in Phase II)
  • Provide assessment on how your cat is doing
  • Not board your cat (if at all possible) during the study
  • Make no changes to your cat’s diet during Phase I
Q6. Are all clinical trials/studies regulated by the FDA (Food and Drug Administration)?

No, and it is always wise to ask before enrolling your pet. The FDA is the government agency that is concerned with the effects of foods, drugs and cosmetics on humans and animals. Before a new animal drug can be approved by the FDA, it must undergo extensive safety and effectiveness testing, just like new drugs for humans.  Clinical trials regulated by the FDA must be conducted according to strict protocols that ensure consistent procedures are followed at each study site.

Q7. Are there any risks involved to my cat?

As with all medications, there are risks and benefits. The clinical investigator (veterinarian) will review these with you at your cat’s preliminary evaluation.

Q8. Are there any costs involved?

Costs for all tests and medications required for the study are paid by the study sponsor (a major animal health pharmaceutical company).

Q9. Who is paying for the trial?

A major animal health pharmaceutical company is sponsoring the study.

Q10. How many times will I need to take my cat to the investigator’s hospital?

Phase I will require approximately four visits to the veterinary investigator’s hospital. Phase II is expected to require five visits.

Q11. How long does the study last?

The study will involve two phases: Phase I will last 30 days, and Phase II will last 150 days. Cats that complete Phase I, show improvement, and meet certain other parameters may continue into Phase II at the discretion of the investigator.

Q12. How do I learn if there’s an investigator site near me?

Use this tool and enter your zip code to find out if there is an investigator site near you.


The medication given to cats in the study may or may not help with their condition. As with all medications, there are risks and benefits – all of which will be discussed with you prior to enrolling your cat.

Find an
investigator
near you

Thank you for caring
about cats and for
your interest in
participating in this
important study.

There are approximately 20 clinical investigator sites located at veterinary practices across the U.S.

Please enter your zip code below to determine if there is a site convenient to you.


      The medication given to cats in the study may or may not help with their condition. As with all medications, there are risks and benefits – all of which will be discussed with you prior to enrolling your cat.

      Contact Us

      Still have questions about the study?

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